Unit 3 Summative Graphic Organizer/Outline

Unit 3 Summative Graphic Organizer/Outline
  The following organizer follows the traditional model of an essay: introduction paragraph, two body paragraphs, a conclusion paragraph. The final format of your essay will depend on you. Feel free to use this organizer as a way to flesh out some of your ideas before putting them on paper. This is NOT “the way,” this is simply a way to help make your ideas a little more tangible.
  Title of Short Story  “Sunset, Sunset”
  Author  Edwidge Danticat
  Prompt  “Art is on the side of the oppressed”  Evaluate the means by which one of Danticat’s short stories either confirms or raises questions about the validity of this assertion.
  Introduction & Thesis
  You have probably often heard that the introduction should grab the reader’s attention. (The term “hook” might sound familiar). That might be true, but that is not the sole function of an introduction. An introduction must set up the argument that follows, so it has to be integrally related to the rest of the paper. Something that grabs the reader’s attention but does not contribute in a significant way to the argument is a waste of words.   Possible  Types  of  Introductions                                  Sample  Thesis  Statements  and  Sentence  Frames
  Hook & Bridge  Check out the “Possible Types of Introductions” doc for examples
 
ThesisYour thesis is the guiding statement of the essay. It should include the author, title of work, and at least two verb phrases that identify and explain how the author of the work does what he or she does + author’s purpose.
 
  Body Paragraph 1 (Note: You will need to repeat these steps depending on how many body paragraphs you include.)
  Topic Sentence  Your topic sentence tells your reader what your main argument for that paragraph is going to be. If you want to think of it another way, this is the claim of your paragraph. You will spend the rest of the paragraph proving your topic sentence.
 
  Introduce Supporting Evidence  This is also known as context. This is where you give your reader enough information about what is going on in the text so the evidence you are about to give makes sense. You can’t just use a quote without explaining where it came from. Do things like explaining which characters are involved, where they are, and what they are doing at the time of the quote.
 

Adapted from Carolyn P. Henley & Angela Stancar Johnson in Literary Analysis for English Literature

  Supporting Evidence  The evidence needs to be a good example that helps prove your claim is true. It should be embedded in your sentence and properly cited.
 
  Analysis / Explanation  Your analysis is where you really get to make your point clear. Explain how your evidence helps prove your claim is true. Tell your reader why your evidence is a good example that shows your claim is correct. A good rule is to have at least two sentences of analysis for every piece of text evidence.
 
  Transition  Transition to your next piece of text evidence with a statement that includes a transition  word  or  phrase.
 
  Introduce Supporting Evidence  This is also known as context. This is where you give your reader enough information about what is going on in the text so the evidence you are about to give makes sense. You can’t just use a quote without explaining where it came from. Do things like explaining which characters are involved, where they are, and what they are doing at the time of the quote.
 
  Supporting Evidence  The evidence needs to be a good example that helps prove your claim is true. It should be embedded in your sentence and properly cited.
 
Analysis / ExplanationYour analysis is where you really get to make your point clear. Explain how your evidence helps prove your claim is true. Tell your reader why your evidence is a good example that shows your claim is correct. A good rule is to have at least two sentences of analysis for every piece of text evidence.
 
  Concluding Statement  Wrap up your body paragraph by revisiting your topic sentence and linking the main point of this body paragraph back to the thesis.
 
  Body Paragraph 2 (Note: You will need to repeat these steps depending on how many body paragraphs you include.)
  Topic Sentence  Your topic sentence tells your reader what your main argument for that paragraph is going to be. If you want to think of it another way, this is the claim of your paragraph. You will spend the rest of the paragraph proving your topic sentence.
 
  Introduce  This is also known as context. This is where you give your reader enough information about

Adapted from Carolyn P. Henley & Angela Stancar Johnson in Literary Analysis for English Literature

  Supporting Evidence  what is going on in the text so the evidence you are about to give makes sense. You can’t just use a quote without explaining where it came from. Do things like explaining which characters are involved, where they are, and what they are doing at the time of the quote.
 
Supporting EvidenceThe evidence needs to be a good example that helps prove your claim is true. It should be embedded in your sentence and properly cited.
 
  Analysis / Explanation  Your analysis is where you really get to make your point clear. Explain how your evidence helps prove your claim is true. Tell your reader why your evidence is a good example that shows your claim is correct. A good rule is to have at least two sentences of analysis for every piece of text evidence.
 
TransitionTransition to your next piece of text evidence with a statement that includes a transition  word  or  phrase.
 
Introduce Supporting EvidenceThis is also known as context. This is where you give your reader enough information about what is going on in the text so the evidence you are about to give makes sense. You can’t just use a quote without explaining where it came from. Do things like explaining which characters are involved, where they are, and what they are doing at the time of the quote.
 
  Supporting Evidence  The evidence needs to be a good example that helps prove your claim is true. It should be embedded in your sentence and properly cited.
 
  Analysis / Explanation  Your analysis is where you really get to make your point clear. Explain how your evidence helps prove your claim is true. Tell your reader why your evidence is a good example that shows your claim is correct. A good rule is to have at least two sentences of analysis for every piece of text evidence.
 
  Concluding Statement  Wrap up your body paragraph by revisiting your topic sentence and linking the main point of this body paragraph back to the thesis.
 
  Note: If you need more boxes click here.
Conclusion

Adapted from Carolyn P. Henley & Angela Stancar Johnson in Literary Analysis for English Literature

Your literary analysis essay should have a concluding paragraph that gives your essay a sense of completeness and lets your readers know that they have come to the end of your paper. Your concluding paragraph might answer the question “So What?”, synthesize your overall argument, or connect the ideas in your paper to a universal idea / “the human condition”. Do not introduce a new topic in your conclusion.

Adapted from Carolyn P. Henley & Angela Stancar Johnson in Literary Analysis for English Literature

Unit 3 Summative: Short Story Literary Analysis Rubric
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